Learn how to read waves – Lesson 1

Where can we begin to learn to read the sea and the waves? 🤔

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At first, the simplest thing is to start identifying waves considering the use we intend to make of them that is to surf.
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The information we can learn about the sea is so much that you don‘t even expect this information to be easy to interpret or identify when you look at the sea because not always the waves will look so well drawn – Credit to the designer or the designer eheh.
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Usually, we start by learning in a zone where we always have contact with the bottom, ′′ standing on the ground ′′ at emptier tides, where the waves are already broken or burst. These waves we call ′′ foam “, white waves, broken waves.

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Later we start taking a direction:
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Waves to the right: in which the reference is Surfer facing the beach who catches a wave that is higher on his left side and bursts in sequence from left to right.
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Waves to the left: being the surfer reference, that‘s when the wave resells first on its right side towards the left side.
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Surfers also dream a lot of triangular peaks where the same wave can be surfed by two surfers at the same time as this beautiful and perfect breakdown both ways. Foreigners call it ′′ The Frame “. We call it a triangular peak.
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This is one of the very few ways to surf the same wave with a friend! 😉
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Then, a wave we don‘t want to catch is a closeout or, as we sometimes call a slang of our own, a guillotine! The closeout is a wave that closes all at the same time quickly, giving no possibility to be surfed on the wall, just allowing us to go for it.
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➡️   Did you like this matter? Then save to review later and share with that surfing session friend. 🤪